Book Review: Ring Shout by P. Djéli Clark

Book Review: Ring Shout by P. Djéli Clark

I recently stumbled upon “Ring Shout” by P. Djèlí Clark during a visit to the library, and let me tell you, I’m thrilled that I did. Clark, a decorated author who has claimed prestigious awards such as the Nebula, Locus, and Alex Awards, delves into the realm of horror with this dark fantasy historical novella that ingeniously infuses a supernatural twist into the notorious reign of the Ku Klux Klan.

Transporting us back to the 1920s, Clark introduces us to a courageous group of Black resistance fighters determined to take down a sect of demonic Ku Klux Klan members. Seriously, they’re some kind of spirit monsters.

The “Ku Kluxes” are hell-bent on summoning a malevolent being to further their despicable agenda, and Maryse Boudreaux, blade-wielding monster hunter, stands in their way.

Sale
Ring Shout
  • Hardcover Book
  • Clark, P. Djèlí (Author)
  • English (Publication Language)
  • 192 Pages – 10/13/2020 (Publication Date) – Tordotcom (Publisher)

“Ring Shout” captivates from the very beginning, offering an intense and gripping narrative that vividly depicts the horrors of racism and violence in the early 20th century. Clark’s mastery lies in his seamless blending of horror, fantasy, and history, resulting in a truly unique reading experience that leaves a lasting impression.

One of the novel’s standout aspects is the character of Maryse Boudreaux, a formidable monster hunter armed with a lethal blade. Through Maryse, Clark delves into profound themes of resistance, resilience, and the unwavering power of community in the face of oppression. As readers, we witness the strength and determination required to combat injustice, reminding us of the ongoing struggle for racial justice in America. “Ring Shout” serves as both a timely and indispensable work of fiction, shedding light on these crucial issues.

In conclusion, P. Djèlí Clark’s “Ring Shout” is a mesmerizing gem that combines historical events with supernatural elements, crafting an unforgettable tale of bravery and resilience. This novella is a must-read for anyone seeking an enthralling exploration of racial justice, expertly woven into a tapestry of horror and fantasy.


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Thoughts on an Education Twitter Exodus

I’ve been on Twitter for over 15 years now (a disturbing bit of trivia in and of itself) and have seen all the changes along the way.

Since Elon Musk took the company private in October 2022, there’s undoubtedly been an uproar from many who believe the site will become a cesspool of misinformation, hatred, and racism.

Even the education world that embraced Twitter as a way to grow personal learning networks over a decade ago has begun to show signs of leaving the platform.

Musk has already laid off roughly half of Twitter’s staff, fired some top leaders, and deep-sixed its board of directors.

The changes could have major repercussions. Back in 2021, Twitter famously ousted President Donald Trump when he declared that voter fraud had cost him the presidential election, despite an overwhelming lack of evidence to support his claims.

Now educators are wondering whether they will be able to continue using Twitter as they always have, or whether it will become a dumping ground for racism, dangerous misinformation, and threats.

via EdWeek

Personally, I have no plans to leave Twitter. I’ll continue to use it as a platform to connect and share ideas with others.

I can’t control what others do, especially not the actions of Elon Musk, the new owner of Twitter.

And if you’re leaving, I understand. We all have to do what is best for our mental health.

But I wonder if, by leaving, we are only giving power to those we least want controlling the narrative on Twitter.

Maybe we should stick around and keep doing good things and sharing all the good others do, too.