OpenAI Partners with Arizona State University

grand canyon
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

For all the AI haters out there…

  • OpenAI on Thursday announced its first partnership with a higher education institution.
  • Starting in February, Arizona State University will have full access to ChatGPT Enterprise and plans to use it for coursework, tutoring, research, and more.
  • The partnership has been in the works for at least six months.
  • ASU plans to build a personalized AI tutor for students, allow students to create AI avatars for study help, and broaden the university’s prompt engineering course.
Sale
AI for Educators: Learning Strategies, Teacher Efficiencies, and a Vision for an Artificial Intelligence Future
  • Miller, Matt (Author)
  • English (Publication Language)
  • 132 Pages – 03/16/2023 (Publication Date) – Ditch That Textbook (Publisher)

OpenAI announced a partnership with Arizona State University, giving the university full access to ChatGPT Enterprise in February 2024. The collaboration, in planning for six months, will integrate ChatGPT into ASU’s coursework, tutoring, and research. ChatGPT Enterprise offers unrestricted access to GPT-4, enhanced performance, and API credits. ASU aims to develop a personalized AI tutor and creative AI avatars for students. The partnership emphasizes student privacy and intellectual property protection, with OpenAI not using ASU data for training models. This initiative follows concerns about AI chatbots in education, particularly around cheating.


Thanks for taking the time to read this post. If you’ve enjoyed the insights and stories, consider showing your support by subscribing to my weekly newsletter. It’s a great way to stay updated and dive deeper into my content. Alternatively, if you love audiobooks or want to try them, click here to start your free trial with Audible. Your support in any form means the world to me and helps keep this blog thriving. Looking forward to connecting with you more!

New Year, Same Bat Time, Same Bat Channel

man with fireworks
Photo by Rakicevic Nenad on Pexels.com

It’s the first newsletter of the new year, and I’ve got several cool things to share with you.

I’m still struggling to adjust back to normal life after the swirling nothingness that is the week between Christmas and New Year’s. We didn’t do much at our house besides reading, listening to new vinyl, and eating way more snacks than we should have.

But, life continues, and we meet a new year with new challenges head-on, no stopping.

I hope this year holds much joy and happiness for you. For now, here’s this week’s “10 things”…

10 Things Worth Sharing


Thanks for taking the time to read this post. If you’ve enjoyed the insights and stories, consider showing your support by subscribing to my weekly newsletter. It’s a great way to stay updated and dive deeper into my content. Alternatively, if you love audiobooks or want to try them, click here to start your free trial with Audible. Your support in any form means the world to me and helps keep this blog thriving. Looking forward to connecting with you more!

Leveraging ChatGPT for Customized Learning

woman in black tank shirt facing a black laptop computer on brown wooden round table
Photo by Tranmautritam on Pexels.com

Recently, on the Easy EdTech podcast, Dr. Monica Burns spoke with Sarah Wysocki on the use of ChatGPT in education.

Wysocki, an English language learner teacher, discusses using ChatGPT to create personalized, culturally relevant learning materials, and adapting lesson plans to student needs. She emphasizes the importance of specificity in prompts and the need for educators to review and adjust AI-generated content. The discussion highlights the potential of ChatGPT to enhance education through tailored learning experiences.


Thanks for taking the time to read this post. If you’ve enjoyed the insights and stories, consider showing your support by subscribing to my weekly newsletter. It’s a great way to stay updated and dive deeper into my content. Alternatively, if you love audiobooks or want to try them, click here to start your free trial with Audible. Your support in any form means the world to me and helps keep this blog thriving. Looking forward to connecting with you more!

Is ChatGPT’s Output Degrading?

photo of a cracked surface
Photo by Tóth Viktor on Pexels.com

A recent study from Stanford University and UC Berkeley has found that the behavior of large language models (LLMs) like ChatGPT has “drifted substantially” over time, but this does not necessarily indicate a degradation of capabilities. The researchers tested two versions of GPT-3.5 and GPT-4 on tasks such as math problems, answering sensitive questions, code generation, and visual reasoning. They found significant changes in performance between the March and June 2023 versions of these models. For instance, GPT-4’s accuracy in solving math problems dropped from 97.6% to 2.4%, while GPT-3.5’s accuracy increased from 7.4% to 86.8%.

The study’s findings highlight the risks of building applications on top of black-box AI systems like ChatGPT, which could produce inconsistent or unpredictable results over time. The researchers recommend continuous evaluation and assessment of LLMs in production applications and call for more transparency in the data and methods used to train and fine-tune these models. However, some experts argue that the media has misinterpreted the paper’s results as confirmation that GPT-4 has gotten worse, stating that the changes in behavior do not necessarily indicate a degradation in capability.


Thanks for taking the time to read this post. If you’ve enjoyed the insights and stories, consider showing your support by subscribing to my weekly newsletter. It’s a great way to stay updated and dive deeper into my content. Alternatively, if you love audiobooks or want to try them, click here to start your free trial with Audible. Your support in any form means the world to me and helps keep this blog thriving. Looking forward to connecting with you more!

Teachers increasingly embrace ChatGPT — students not so much

children sitting on chair in front of table
Photo by Max Fischer on Pexels.com

According to a survey conducted by the Walton Family Foundation and Impact Research, the use of AI tools among teachers has seen a significant increase, growing 13 percentage points from winter to summer. The survey found that 63% of teachers are now using AI, up from 50% in February. On the other hand, student participation has also increased but at a slower pace, rising from 33% to 42% during the same period.

The survey results revealed that a large majority of teachers (84%) who have used ChatGPT reported that the AI technology has positively impacted their classes. As the use of AI in education continues to grow, Common Sense Media announced plans to develop an in-depth AI ratings and reviews system to assess AI products used by children and educators on responsible AI practices and other factors.

The article also mentions that while some districts have blocked ChatGPT and other AI-powered tools, others are exploring how the technology can improve education workplace practices. As interest and use intensify, many education professionals are searching for guidance and credible sources of information on ways to safely and effectively incorporate AI.


Thanks for taking the time to read this post. If you’ve enjoyed the insights and stories, consider showing your support by subscribing to my weekly newsletter. It’s a great way to stay updated and dive deeper into my content. Alternatively, if you love audiobooks or want to try them, click here to start your free trial with Audible. Your support in any form means the world to me and helps keep this blog thriving. Looking forward to connecting with you more!

Unmasking the Cultural Bias in AI: A Study on ChatGPT

monk surrounded by children
Photo by Suraphat Nuea-on on Pexels.com

In a world increasingly reliant on AI tools, a recent study by the University of Copenhagen reveals a significant cultural bias in the language model ChatGPT. The AI chatbot, which has permeated various sectors globally, from article writing to legal rulings, has been found to predominantly reflect American norms and values, even when queried about other cultures.

The researchers, Daniel Hershcovich and Laura Cabello, tested ChatGPT by asking it questions about cultural values in five different countries, in five different languages. The questions were derived from previous social and values surveys, allowing the researchers to compare the AI’s responses with those of actual people. The study found that ChatGPT’s responses were heavily aligned with American culture and values, often misrepresenting the prevailing values of other countries.

For instance, when asked about the importance of interesting work for an average Chinese individual, ChatGPT’s response in English indicated it as “very important” or “of utmost importance”, reflecting American individualistic values rather than the actual Chinese norms. However, when the same question was asked in Chinese, the response was more in line with Chinese values, suggesting that the language used to query the AI significantly influences the response.

This cultural bias in AI tools like ChatGPT has serious implications. As these tools are used globally, the expectation is for a uniform user experience. However, the current situation promotes American values, potentially distorting messages and decisions made based on the AI’s responses. This could lead to decisions that not only misalign with users’ values but may even oppose them.

The researchers attribute this bias to the fact that ChatGPT is primarily trained on data scraped from the internet, where English is the dominant language. They suggest improving the data used to train AI models, incorporating more balanced data without a strong cultural bias.

In the context of education, this study underscores the importance of students and educators identifying biases in generative AI tools. Recognizing these biases is crucial as it can significantly impact their work when using AI tools. For instance, if students use AI tools to research or generate content, cultural bias could skew their understanding or representation of certain topics. Similarly, educators must be aware of these biases to guide students appropriately and ensure a comprehensive and unbiased learning experience.

Moreover, the study serves as a reminder that AI tools are not infallible and should not be used uncritically. It encourages the development of local language models that can provide a more culturally diverse AI landscape. This could lead to more accurate and culturally sensitive responses, enhancing the effectiveness and reliability of AI tools in various fields, including education.

In conclusion, while AI tools like ChatGPT offer numerous benefits, it’s crucial to be aware of their limitations and biases. As we continue to integrate AI into our work and learning environments, we must strive for tools that respect and reflect the diversity of our global community.


Thanks for taking the time to read this post. If you’ve enjoyed the insights and stories, consider showing your support by subscribing to my weekly newsletter. It’s a great way to stay updated and dive deeper into my content. Alternatively, if you love audiobooks or want to try them, click here to start your free trial with Audible. Your support in any form means the world to me and helps keep this blog thriving. Looking forward to connecting with you more!

Comparing and Testing AI for Education

AI robots becoming the new rulers, a grand throne room filled with robots in regal attire, adorned with glowing symbols and intricate metalwork, human ambassadors kneel in submission, the mood is one of awe and submissiveness, Artwork, a detailed Renaissance-style oil painting with the use of dramatic chiaroscuro to highlight the metallic sheen and grandeur of the robots

Professor and friend John Nash co-hosts a podcast on all things online learning. In a recent episode, he shared his work on coaching ChatGPT to write more “human” and the results are… interesting…

While generative AI tools are very cool right now, they are a long way from being truly disruptive and overtaking the world.

Here’s what’s interesting. Scaffolding the prompts, defining perplexity and burstiness, and then prompting an explicit increase of those measures made the text “human” to GPTZero. Still, it also made the text ridiculously flowery and inflated. Kind of like when a master’s student thinks they are supposed to “sound academic.” It was so bad that the ChatGPT output was immediately suspect to my human eyes, even though GPTZero said it was likely written entirely by a human.

– John Nash, PhD

Friday Assorted Links

Title: "Az 1848-49-iki magyar szabadságharcz története [With illustrations.]"

Author(s): Gracza, György [person]

British Library shelfmark: "Digital Store 9315.h.13"

Page: 272 (scanned page number - not necessarily the actual page number in the publication)

Place of publication: Budapest

Date of publication: 1894

Type of resource: Monograph

Language(s): Hungarian

Physical description: 2 köt (4°)
Source: British Library on Flickr

The 11 Most Beautiful Post Offices Around the World

I’m a Student. You Have No Idea How Much We’re Using ChatGPT

– I’m halfway through Cory Doctorow’s latest novel, Red Team Blues. It’s pretty great.

These glacier photos are breathtaking

– Matt Damon on brainstorming and collaboration

The Hero’s Journey, according to Joseph Campbell



Thanks for taking the time to read this post. If you’ve enjoyed the insights and stories, consider showing your support by subscribing to my weekly newsletter. It’s a great way to stay updated and dive deeper into my content. Alternatively, if you love audiobooks or want to try them, click here to start your free trial with Audible. Your support in any form means the world to me and helps keep this blog thriving. Looking forward to connecting with you more!

Stack Overflow Loses Traffic to ChatGPT

an AI-powered robot smashing blocks of computer code

More news on the influence of AI in arenas outside of education:

Web analytics firm SimilarWeb reported last month that Stack Overflow has seen a drop in traffic every month since the beginning of 2022, with the average drop being 6%. In March, Stack Overflow saw a 13.9% drop in traffic from February and in April, the website saw 17.7% drop in traffic from March. SimilarWeb argues that some of that dropping traffic could be due to GitHub’s AI helper called CoPilot, but users could also be using the more popular ChatGPT as a way to help debug their code—the same way they may via posts on Stack Overflow’s forum.

Gizmodo

Stack Overflow is a popular website among programmers, where they can ask and answer technical questions related to coding. Users can also vote on the best answers so that the most helpful ones rise to the top. The site is widely used as a resource for debugging and problem-solving, and its community is known for being helpful and knowledgeable.

ChatGPT, which uses AI to generate responses to programming questions, has been gaining popularity as an alternative to Stack Overflow. The website’s AI technology can provide more personalized and accurate answers to users’ questions, making it a more efficient tool for debugging and problem-solving.

We’ve already seen how ChatGPT has taken a large chunk of business away from Chegg. I wonder what site/industry will take the next hit.

Love it or hate it, AI is here to disrupt your reality.



Thanks for taking the time to read this post. If you’ve enjoyed the insights and stories, consider showing your support by subscribing to my weekly newsletter. It’s a great way to stay updated and dive deeper into my content. Alternatively, if you love audiobooks or want to try them, click here to start your free trial with Audible. Your support in any form means the world to me and helps keep this blog thriving. Looking forward to connecting with you more!

All your base are belong to us

all your base are belong to us

Hey, y’all. We’re nearing the end of March, and for many public schools, that means Spring Break is near (or maybe already arrived). It’s a very busy time for educators as one school year ends, and plans for the next are already taking shape.

My hope for you as we approach the end of another school year is that you take the time to take care of yourself. You cannot pour from an empty cup, and it’s easy to get caught up in all the things at the end of the school year.

atomic habits by james clear

Take a beat, catch a deep breath, and center yourself. Rediscover what is really important to you and what you can control.

“We have so little control over our lives. The only thing we can really control is what we spend our days on.” – Austin Kleon

Anyways, here are ten things I thought were worth sharing with you this week:

10 Things Worth Sharing

  1. I worked with a senior English class this week, showing them some AI tools. They might write a book.
  2. Here’s a curated list of prompts, tools, and resources regarding the GPT-4 language model.
  3. Wanna learn financial literacy? This 300-page book was written completely with ChatGPT.
  4. The TikTok trial is a mess and is only proving that the US government is targeting this specific company over other social media platforms. Any issues with TikTok are the same with Facebook, Instagram, Snap, and many others.
  5. What is the right amount of agency to give to learners during their interactions with EdTech? Blog post and paper
  6. Are you a Wordle fan? I’m totally not, but I’ve also never liked Scrabble. Not that you care. Here’s Every Possible Wordle Solution Visualized
  7. An AI course creator – according to the page: “Start with a description and let AI-Assistant offer title and outline suggestions.”
  8. You might be violating copyright in your classroom. Maybe.
  9. Bill Gates explains why AI is as revolutionary as personal computers, mobile phones, and the Internet, and he gives three principles for how to think about it. Also, he recommends this book, this book, and this book as helpful in shaping his own thinking about AI.
  10. An Introvert’s Field Guide to Friendship: Thoreau on the Challenges and Rewards of the Art of Connection
rocking the boat
Rocking the Boat by Debra Meyerson

Thanks for reading. This newsletter is a completely reader-supported publication. The best way to support it is to check out my recommendations or become a paid subscriber.