OpenAI Partners with Arizona State University

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For all the AI haters out there…

  • OpenAI on Thursday announced its first partnership with a higher education institution.
  • Starting in February, Arizona State University will have full access to ChatGPT Enterprise and plans to use it for coursework, tutoring, research, and more.
  • The partnership has been in the works for at least six months.
  • ASU plans to build a personalized AI tutor for students, allow students to create AI avatars for study help, and broaden the university’s prompt engineering course.
AI for Educators: Learning Strategies, Teacher Efficiencies, and a Vision for an Artificial Intelligence Future
  • Miller, Matt (Author)
  • English (Publication Language)
  • 132 Pages – 03/16/2023 (Publication Date) – Ditch That Textbook (Publisher)

OpenAI announced a partnership with Arizona State University, giving the university full access to ChatGPT Enterprise in February 2024. The collaboration, in planning for six months, will integrate ChatGPT into ASU’s coursework, tutoring, and research. ChatGPT Enterprise offers unrestricted access to GPT-4, enhanced performance, and API credits. ASU aims to develop a personalized AI tutor and creative AI avatars for students. The partnership emphasizes student privacy and intellectual property protection, with OpenAI not using ASU data for training models. This initiative follows concerns about AI chatbots in education, particularly around cheating.


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A comprehensive AI policy education framework for university teaching and learning

The study titled “A comprehensive AI policy education framework for university teaching and learning” aims to develop an AI education policy for higher education by examining the perceptions and implications of text-generative AI technologies. The research collected data from 457 students and 180 teachers and staff across various disciplines in Hong Kong universities, using both quantitative and qualitative research methods. Based on the findings, the study proposes an AI Ecological Education Policy Framework to address the multifaceted implications of AI integration in university teaching and learning. This framework is organized into three dimensions: Pedagogical, Governance, and Operational. The Pedagogical dimension focuses on using AI to improve teaching and learning outcomes, while the Governance dimension tackles issues related to privacy, security, and accountability. The Operational dimension addresses matters concerning infrastructure and training.

The framework fosters a nuanced understanding of the implications of AI integration in academic settings, ensuring that stakeholders are aware of their responsibilities and can take appropriate actions accordingly. The study highlights the importance of students playing an active role in drafting and implementing the policy. The research also addresses the growing concern in academic settings about the use of text-generative artificial intelligence (AI), such as ChatGPT, Bing, and the latest, Co-Pilot, integrated within the Microsoft Office suite. The study found that nearly one in three students had used a form of AI, such as essay-generating software, to complete their coursework. This has led to calls for stricter regulations and penalties for academic misconduct involving AI. Read the full study here.

Friday Assorted Links

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Learning Transformed: 8 Keys to Designing Tomorrow’s Schools, Today
  • Sheninger, Eric C. (Author)
  • English (Publication Language)
  • 260 Pages – 06/06/2017 (Publication Date) – ASCD (Publisher)
  1. Do Professors Have a Right to Mistreat Students?
  2. A Winter Break Reading List on Skills for Scholars
  3. Chicago doubled the number of social workers in schools. Is it helping?
  4. New Report from Global Google Research Project Considers the ‘Future of Education’