16 November 2023

Quote of the Day

"To paraphrase Abraham Lincoln, Donald Trump does not appeal to “the better angels of our nature.”" (Michael V. Hayden, The Assault on Intelligence)

“To paraphrase Abraham Lincoln, Donald Trump does not appeal to “the better angels of our nature.”” (Michael V. Hayden, The Assault on Intelligence)

Musical Interlude

Philip Glass has a new album releasing in January 2024, recorded at his home during the pandemic.

This is my piano, the instrument on which most of the music was written. It’s also the same room where I have worked for decades in the middle of the energy which New York City itself has brought to me. The listener may hear the quiet hum of New York in the background or feel the influence of time and memory that this space affords. To the degree possible, I made this record to invite the listener in.

– Philip Glass

Long Read of the Day

Taruna Goel highlights how digital literacy has transformed from basic computer skills to a complex skill set involving creation, curation, and critical evaluation of digital content.

This framework includes eight thematic competencies: ethical and legal; technology; information literacy; digital scholarship; communication and collaboration; creation and curation; digital well-being; and community-based learning. Through a scenario involving an educator, Professor Emily, and a student, Alex, the article demonstrates the integration of these competencies into the educational journey, emphasizing that digital literacy is crucial for academic, professional, and personal success in a digitally-driven world

The Digital Literacy Framework is a part of the overall B.C. Digital Learning Strategy developed by the Digital Learning Advisory Committee, a collaboration between the Ministry of Post-Secondary Education and Future Skills and the post-secondary system. The Digital Literacy Framework has been developed to enhance digital literacy knowledge, skills, and abilities across post-secondary communities. The framework includes eight thematic competencies within digital literacy: ethical and legal; technology; information literacy; digital scholarship; communication and collaboration; creation and curation; digital well-being; and community-based learning.

Photo of the Day

I didn’t realize it this morning, but it’s Red Cup Day at Starbucks. In my ignorance, I also didn’t know that many baristas walked out today to fight for better wages. Kudos to them. And thanks for my demon cups.

starbucks red cups

Final Thoughts

I love tools that let us learn more about our universe, especially when they are available online.

Astronomers have created the Siena Galaxy Atlas, freely available online. The SGA catalogs 383,620 galaxies, a small fraction of the estimated 200 billion to two trillion galaxies in the observable universe. This atlas stands out for its extensive coverage and advanced data collection, encompassing 7,637 downloadable pages with detailed information on each galaxy’s size, morphology, and images in optical and infrared wavelengths.

The data is drawn from three Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument Legacy Surveys, making it one of the largest surveys ever conducted. The SGA is noted for being the first cosmic atlas to feature light profiles of galaxies, providing a unique insight into their brightness changes from center to edge. It’s a valuable resource for scientists studying galaxy evolution, dark matter distribution, and gravitational waves, as well as for enhancing the public’s understanding of the universe.


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Fill the hours more meaningfully

mount washington kentucky water tower

“The month of November makes me feel that life is passing more quickly. In an effort to slow it down, I try to fill the hours more meaningfully.” – Henry Rollins

Is it just me, or are the short work weeks the ones filled with craziness? It’s been a crazy busy week around these parts, and it’ll be even crazier as we head toward Thanksgiving.

Anyway, here we go…

10 Things Worth Sharing

This week’s 10 things…

BONUS: I’ve been jamming to this album from Azymuth, a Brazilian jazz-funk band. It’s fantastic and makes for great background music while you work


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Now and Then…

recording studio with ultra violet florescent
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

“In November, a man will eat his heart, if in any month.” —Henry David Thoreau, 1852

Happy Friday! It’s been a busy week around here with all the things happening: school visits, doctoral work, and the joys of a new puppy at home. I hope your November is off to a great start and that you are heading into the holiday season with hope and love. I know we all have so many things on our plates this time of year and I hope those things bring you joy.

Speaking of things, here’s 10 of them!

10 Things Worth Sharing



Thanks for taking the time to read this post. If you’ve enjoyed the insights and stories, consider showing your support by subscribing to my weekly newsletter. It’s a great way to stay updated and dive deeper into my content. Alternatively, if you love audiobooks or want to try them, click here to start your free trial with Audible. Your support in any form means the world to me and helps keep this blog thriving. Looking forward to connecting with you more!

How to Use Google Drive in the Classroom: A Teacher’s Guide

In today’s digital age, the classroom is no longer confined to four walls. Educators can create a dynamic and collaborative learning environment with tools like Google Drive. This guide focuses on how to use Google Drive in the classroom, offering insights and tips to enhance teaching and learning experiences.

What is Google Drive, and Why Use It in the Classroom?

Google Drive is a cloud-based storage system that allows users to save, share, and collaborate on files. Here’s why it’s a game-changer for educators:

  1. Accessibility: Teachers and students can access files from anywhere, anytime.
  2. Collaboration: Work on documents simultaneously, fostering teamwork and creativity.
  3. Organization: Keep all classroom materials in one place, neatly organized.
  4. Integration: Seamlessly integrate with other Google tools like Docs, Sheets, and Slides.
how to use google drive in the classroom
Photo by Caio on Pexels.com

Getting Started: How to Use Google Drive in the Classroom

Setting Up Google Drive

Access Google Drive by visiting drive.google.com. Teachers can also install Google Drive on their PCs or mobile devices for on-the-go access.

Creating and Organizing Folders

Create folders for different subjects, projects, or students. Customize them with colors for easy identification.

Uploading Teaching Materials

Drag and drop files or use the “New” button to upload lesson plans, presentations, worksheets, etc.

Sharing Resources with Students

Share files or folders with students by generating a link or inviting them via email. Set permissions to control editing or viewing rights.

Bestseller No. 1
Google Drive
  • Get access to files anywhere through secure cloud storage and file backup for your photos, videos, files and more with Google Drive.
  • English (Publication Language)
SaleBestseller No. 2
The Google Workspace Bible: [14 in 1] The Ultimate All-in-One Guide from Beginner to Advanced | Including Gmail, Drive, Docs, Sheets, and Every Other App from the Suite
  • Pascall, Robert G. (Author)
  • English (Publication Language)
  • 279 Pages – 03/07/2023 (Publication Date) – Zetra WebWorker (Publisher)
Bestseller No. 3
Mastering Google Drive: A Step-by-Step Handbook for Beginners to Streamline Your Workflow, Secure Your Data, and Collaborate with Ease
  • Amazon Kindle Edition
  • Pascall, Robert G. (Author)
  • English (Publication Language)
  • 98 Pages – 01/08/2024 (Publication Date) – PublishDrive (Publisher)
Bestseller No. 4
Google Drive Made Easy: Online Storage and Sharing the Easy Way (Productivity Apps Made Easy)
  • Bernstein, James (Author)
  • English (Publication Language)
  • 113 Pages – 08/25/2022 (Publication Date) – CME Publishing (Publisher)
Bestseller No. 5
Google Drive & Docs In 30 Minutes: The unofficial guide to Google Drive, Docs, Sheets & Slides
  • Lamont, Ian (Author)
  • English (Publication Language)
  • 104 Pages – 01/26/2021 (Publication Date) – In 30 Minutes Guides (Publisher)
Bestseller No. 6
Google Drive Reference and Cheat Sheet: The unofficial cheat sheet reference for Google Drive
  • hole punched
  • high quality card stock
  • 4 pages
  • made in USA
  • keyboard shortcuts
Bestseller No. 7
Google Drive Quick Reference Training Card – Laminated Tutorial Guide Cheat Sheet (Instructions and Tips)
  • TeachUcomp Inc (Author)
  • English (Publication Language)
  • 2 Pages – 09/09/2021 (Publication Date) – TeachUcomp Inc (Publisher)
Bestseller No. 8
Google Drive & Docs in 30 Minutes (2nd Edition): The unofficial guide to the new Google Drive, Docs, Sheets & Slides
  • Lamont, Ian (Author)
  • English (Publication Language)
  • 112 Pages – 01/26/2015 (Publication Date) – In 30 Minutes Guides (Publisher)
Bestseller No. 9
Google Drive Quick Source Reference Guide
  • Quick Source (Author)
  • English (Publication Language)
  • 6 Pages – 03/01/2013 (Publication Date) – Quick Source (Publisher)
Bestseller No. 10
Google Drive and Docs for Beginners 2021: A Comprehensive Guide to Mastering Google drive and docs
  • Norris, David B. (Author)
  • English (Publication Language)
  • 80 Pages – 01/26/2021 (Publication Date) – Independently published (Publisher)

Collaborative Learning with Google Drive

Collaborative Projects

Assign group projects where students can work together on the same document, encouraging collaboration and critical thinking.

Real-Time Feedback

Provide real-time feedback on students’ work by adding comments directly in the documents.

Classroom Portfolios

Students can create digital portfolios within Google Drive, showcasing their work throughout the year.

Tips for Using Google Drive in the Classroom

  1. Set Clear Guidelines: Teach students how to use Google Drive responsibly and set clear guidelines for collaboration.
  2. Use Templates: Create templates for common assignments to streamline the process.
  3. Explore Add-Ons: Utilize add-ons and extensions that integrate with Google Drive to enhance functionality.
  4. Monitor Collaborations: Keep track of changes and contributions by using the “Version History” feature.

Conclusion: Embrace Digital Learning with Google Drive

How to use Google Drive in the classroom is a question with an exciting array of answers. From fostering collaboration to organizing resources, Google Drive offers a plethora of opportunities to enhance the learning experience.

Teachers can create a more engaging, interactive, and organized learning environment by integrating Google Drive into the classroom. It’s not just about storing files; it’s about creating a dynamic space where education thrives.


Thanks for taking the time to read this post. If you’ve enjoyed the insights and stories, consider showing your support by subscribing to my weekly newsletter. It’s a great way to stay updated and dive deeper into my content. Alternatively, if you love audiobooks or want to try them, click here to start your free trial with Audible. Your support in any form means the world to me and helps keep this blog thriving. Looking forward to connecting with you more!

Accessing Education: Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion in Online Learning

group of people standing indoors
Photo by fauxels on Pexels.com

A recently published paper explores the challenges and opportunities for equity, diversity, and inclusion (EDI) in online and hybrid learning. The study found that online and hybrid learning both supports and presents challenges to EDI, and that pedagogy and course design must be considered as a first step in addressing some of the challenges to EDI.

The study also found that further student support is needed to facilitate equity, diversity, and inclusion in online learning.

Overall, the paper highlights the importance of addressing EDI in online and hybrid learning and offers several recommendations for doing so.

These recommendations include:

  • Prioritizing the implementation of policies that support equity, diversity, and inclusion.
  • Considering the principles of Universal Design for Learning (UDL) to ensure that course materials are accessible to all learners.
  • Providing training for instructors to use UDL principles to design and deliver courses that are inclusive and accessible to all learners.
  • Providing support for learners who face challenges related to access, such as those with learning differences and/or disabilities, or those who live in underserved, remote/rural communities.
  • Engaging with reconciliation, decolonization, and Indigenization as part of the pursuit of EDI goals.
Sale
UDL and Blended Learning: Thriving in Flexible Learning Landscapes
  • Novak, Katie (Author)
  • English (Publication Language)
  • 232 Pages – 05/29/2021 (Publication Date) – Impress (Publisher)

The paper also highlights the need for further student support to facilitate equity, diversity, and inclusion in online learning, and encourages readers to engage with reconciliation, decolonization, and Indigenization as part of the pursuit of EDI goals.


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Gamified e-learning platform Kahoot gets acquired in a $1.7B deal led by Goldman Sachs, Lego, and more

kahoot

Kahoot, the Oslo-based startup known for its gamified e-learning platform, is set to go fully private in an all-cash private equity deal led by Goldman Sachs Assets Management, valuing the company at $1.7 billion. The deal also includes existing Kahoot backers General Atlantic, LEGO Group’s KIRKBI Invest A/S, and Glitrafjord, controlled by Kahoot CEO Eilert Hanoa, among others. Despite the premium on Kahoot’s publicly traded shares, the valuation is a step down from the company’s peak during the COVID-19 pandemic, reflecting the struggles tech companies face in the current economic climate.

Kahoot has seen significant growth due to the rise of remote learning, hosting hundreds of millions of learning sessions with 9 billion participants in over 200 countries. However, like many tech businesses, it has struggled in the public markets post-pandemic. The company’s Q2 financials showed $41 million in revenues, up just 14% on last year, and cash equivalents of $96 million by the end of the second quarter. Despite not being at its peak valuation, the private equity group believes in the long-term opportunity of Kahoot.

Original Article

Teachers increasingly embrace ChatGPT — students not so much

children sitting on chair in front of table
Photo by Max Fischer on Pexels.com

According to a survey conducted by the Walton Family Foundation and Impact Research, the use of AI tools among teachers has seen a significant increase, growing 13 percentage points from winter to summer. The survey found that 63% of teachers are now using AI, up from 50% in February. On the other hand, student participation has also increased but at a slower pace, rising from 33% to 42% during the same period.

The survey results revealed that a large majority of teachers (84%) who have used ChatGPT reported that the AI technology has positively impacted their classes. As the use of AI in education continues to grow, Common Sense Media announced plans to develop an in-depth AI ratings and reviews system to assess AI products used by children and educators on responsible AI practices and other factors.

The article also mentions that while some districts have blocked ChatGPT and other AI-powered tools, others are exploring how the technology can improve education workplace practices. As interest and use intensify, many education professionals are searching for guidance and credible sources of information on ways to safely and effectively incorporate AI.


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How Teachers Are Using ChatGPT in Class

children using laptop
Photo by Max Fischer on Pexels.com

Larry Ferlazzo shares a round-up of educators who share their unique experiences incorporating AI tools like ChatGPT into their teaching methods.

Mary Beth Hertz, a high school teacher, leverages AI to educate her students about the nuances and biases inherent in artificial intelligence. She encourages her students to interact with ChatGPT, fostering a deeper understanding of AI’s strengths and limitations. In her entrepreneurship class, ChatGPT is used as a tool to refine mission statements and business pitch language.

Paul Wilkinson, a teacher of secondary English and social studies, employs AI to devise learning challenges for his students and provide them with comprehensive feedback. He uses AI to create curriculum-based content, formulate rubrics, and offer personalized feedback to each student. He also designed a reflection assignment to enhance students’ metacognitive skills.

Mick McMurray, a teacher specializing in marketing and entrepreneurship, uses ChatGPT as an assistant for student assignments. He crafted a series of ChatGPT prompts for a high school marketing class project, leading to an engaging “choose your own adventure” reading experience for the students.

Of course, the article underscores that while the use of generative AI in K-12 settings is still emerging, it holds the potential to boost student creativity, enhance writing skills, and provide students with a clear understanding of AI’s limitations. The educators involved believe that when used wisely, AI tools can serve as valuable partners in the learning journey.


Thanks for taking the time to read this post. If you’ve enjoyed the insights and stories, consider showing your support by subscribing to my weekly newsletter. It’s a great way to stay updated and dive deeper into my content. Alternatively, if you love audiobooks or want to try them, click here to start your free trial with Audible. Your support in any form means the world to me and helps keep this blog thriving. Looking forward to connecting with you more!

Unmasking the Cultural Bias in AI: A Study on ChatGPT

monk surrounded by children
Photo by Suraphat Nuea-on on Pexels.com

In a world increasingly reliant on AI tools, a recent study by the University of Copenhagen reveals a significant cultural bias in the language model ChatGPT. The AI chatbot, which has permeated various sectors globally, from article writing to legal rulings, has been found to predominantly reflect American norms and values, even when queried about other cultures.

The researchers, Daniel Hershcovich and Laura Cabello, tested ChatGPT by asking it questions about cultural values in five different countries, in five different languages. The questions were derived from previous social and values surveys, allowing the researchers to compare the AI’s responses with those of actual people. The study found that ChatGPT’s responses were heavily aligned with American culture and values, often misrepresenting the prevailing values of other countries.

For instance, when asked about the importance of interesting work for an average Chinese individual, ChatGPT’s response in English indicated it as “very important” or “of utmost importance”, reflecting American individualistic values rather than the actual Chinese norms. However, when the same question was asked in Chinese, the response was more in line with Chinese values, suggesting that the language used to query the AI significantly influences the response.

This cultural bias in AI tools like ChatGPT has serious implications. As these tools are used globally, the expectation is for a uniform user experience. However, the current situation promotes American values, potentially distorting messages and decisions made based on the AI’s responses. This could lead to decisions that not only misalign with users’ values but may even oppose them.

The researchers attribute this bias to the fact that ChatGPT is primarily trained on data scraped from the internet, where English is the dominant language. They suggest improving the data used to train AI models, incorporating more balanced data without a strong cultural bias.

In the context of education, this study underscores the importance of students and educators identifying biases in generative AI tools. Recognizing these biases is crucial as it can significantly impact their work when using AI tools. For instance, if students use AI tools to research or generate content, cultural bias could skew their understanding or representation of certain topics. Similarly, educators must be aware of these biases to guide students appropriately and ensure a comprehensive and unbiased learning experience.

Moreover, the study serves as a reminder that AI tools are not infallible and should not be used uncritically. It encourages the development of local language models that can provide a more culturally diverse AI landscape. This could lead to more accurate and culturally sensitive responses, enhancing the effectiveness and reliability of AI tools in various fields, including education.

In conclusion, while AI tools like ChatGPT offer numerous benefits, it’s crucial to be aware of their limitations and biases. As we continue to integrate AI into our work and learning environments, we must strive for tools that respect and reflect the diversity of our global community.


Thanks for taking the time to read this post. If you’ve enjoyed the insights and stories, consider showing your support by subscribing to my weekly newsletter. It’s a great way to stay updated and dive deeper into my content. Alternatively, if you love audiobooks or want to try them, click here to start your free trial with Audible. Your support in any form means the world to me and helps keep this blog thriving. Looking forward to connecting with you more!

Revolutionizing K-12 Education: The Role of Generative AI Tools

a close up shot of letter dice
Photo by Nataliya Vaitkevich on Pexels.com

The world of education, specifically K-12, is on the brink of a significant transformation. The catalyst? Generative AI tools. These tools, such as Large Language Models (LLMs) and ChatGPT, are heralding a new era of automation, promising to reshape how we approach administrative and teaching tasks in schools.

Generative AI tools are a generational leap in what we can automate with software. They are not just about replacing human effort but also about creating entirely new kinds of automation. The potential impact on jobs and people is profound, and the pace of change is rapid. For instance, ChatGPT has already amassed over 100 million users in just six months.

The world of education is no stranger to automation. Over the past two centuries, we’ve seen waves of automation that have eliminated certain jobs while creating new ones. This process, while sometimes disruptive, has ultimately led to increased prosperity and efficiency.

For school administrators and teachers, generative AI tools could automate many tasks, freeing up time for more strategic and student-focused activities. For example, these tools could automate administrative tasks such as scheduling, record-keeping, and communication with parents. They could also assist teachers with tasks such as grading, lesson planning, and even providing personalized learning support for students.

However, the adoption of these tools is not without challenges. The tools that people use to do their jobs are complicated and very specialized, embodying a lot of work and institutional knowledge. Replacing or automating any of these tools and tasks is not trivial. There’s a huge difference between an amazing demo of a transformative technology and something that a big complicated organization can use.

Moreover, while generative AI tools can answer ‘anything’, the answer might be wrong. They are not databases but pattern matchers. They can produce answers that fit the pattern of the question but may not be factually correct. This means that while they can automate many tasks, their outputs still need to be checked.

Despite these challenges, the potential benefits of generative AI tools in K-12 education are immense. They could lead to more efficient administration, more personalized learning, and ultimately, better educational outcomes for students. However, it’s important to remember that these tools are not a magic bullet. They are just another wave of automation, and their successful implementation will require careful planning, training, and adjustment.

In conclusion, generative AI tools hold great promise for automating tasks in K-12 education. However, their adoption will require careful planning and a clear understanding of their capabilities and limitations. As with any new technology, the key to success will be in how well we integrate these tools into our existing systems and processes, and how well we adapt to the new ways of working they enable.

FAQ

  1. What is generative AI? Generative AI, including Large Language Models (LLMs) and ChatGPT, represents a significant change in what we can automate with software. It’s not just about replacing human effort but also about creating entirely new kinds of automation.
  2. How fast is the adoption of generative AI tools like ChatGPT? The adoption is happening very rapidly. For instance, ChatGPT has amassed over 100 million users in just six months.
  3. What is the potential impact of generative AI on jobs? Generative AI tools have the potential to automate many tasks, which could lead to job displacement. However, similar to previous waves of automation, they could also create new types of jobs.
  4. What challenges are associated with the adoption of generative AI tools? The tools people use to do their jobs are complicated and very specialized, embodying much work and institutional knowledge. Replacing or automating any of these tools and tasks is not trivial. Additionally, while generative AI tools can answer ‘anything,’ the answer might be wrong as they are not databases but pattern matchers.
  5. What is the potential of generative AI tools in the education sector? In the education sector, generative AI tools could automate many administrative tasks and assist teachers with tasks such as grading, lesson planning, and even providing personalized learning support for students.
  6. What is the future of generative AI tools? The future of generative AI tools is likely to involve more automation, but also more integration with existing systems and processes. Their successful implementation will require careful planning, training, and adjustment.
  7. What is the ‘Lump of Labour’ fallacy? The ‘Lump of Labour’ fallacy is the misconception that there is a fixed amount of work to be done and that if a machine takes some work, there will be less work for people. However, if it becomes cheaper to use a machine to make, say, a pair of shoes, then the shoes are cheaper, more people can buy shoes, and they have more money to spend on other things besides, and we discover new things we need or want, and new jobs.
  8. What is the Jevons Paradox? The Jevons Paradox suggests that as technological progress increases the efficiency with which a resource is used, the total consumption of that resource may increase rather than decrease. This paradox has been applied to white-collar work for 150 years.
  9. What is AGI (Artificial General Intelligence)? AGI refers to a type of artificial intelligence that is as capable as a human at any intellectual task. If we had AGI, it could potentially change everything, including overriding all the complexity of real people, real companies, and the real economy. However, as of now, we do not have AGI, and without that, we have only another wave of automation.
  10. How can generative AI tools help in personalized learning? Generative AI tools can provide personalized learning support for students by adapting to each student’s learning style and pace. They can provide additional explanations, practice problems, and feedback, making learning more effective and engaging.
  11. Can generative AI tools replace teachers? While generative AI tools can assist with tasks such as grading and lesson planning, they are not a replacement for teachers. Teachers play a crucial role in motivating students, managing the classroom, and providing emotional support, among other things. These are aspects that cannot be automated.
  12. What is the role of generative AI tools in administrative tasks? Generative AI tools can automate administrative tasks such as scheduling, record-keeping, and communication with parents. This can free up time for school administrators to focus on more strategic tasks.
  13. What is the difference between a database and a pattern matcher in the context of generative AI tools? While databases store and retrieve factual information, pattern matchers, like generative AI tools, generate responses based on patterns they’ve learned from data. This means they can produce answers that fit the pattern of the question but may not be factually correct.
  14. What is the importance of careful planning and training in adopting generative AI tools? The successful implementation of generative AI tools requires careful planning and training. This is because these tools must be integrated into existing systems and processes, and users need to understand their capabilities and limitations.
  15. What does it mean that generative AI tools are not a magic bullet? This means that while generative AI tools hold great promise, they are not a solution to all problems. Their successful implementation will require careful planning, training, and adjustment. They are just another wave of automation, and their impact will depend on how well we adapt to the new ways of working they enable.
  16. What is the potential impact of generative AI tools on educational outcomes? By automating administrative tasks and assisting with teaching tasks, generative AI tools could lead to more efficient administration, more personalized learning, and, ultimately, better educational outcomes for students.

Thanks for taking the time to read this post. If you’ve enjoyed the insights and stories, consider showing your support by subscribing to my weekly newsletter. It’s a great way to stay updated and dive deeper into my content. Alternatively, if you love audiobooks or want to try them, click here to start your free trial with Audible. Your support in any form means the world to me and helps keep this blog thriving. Looking forward to connecting with you more!